Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA)

Page Summary: 
Overview of Florida's DELTA Program
State Future Directions
Local Projects
Purpose of the Program

Overview of Florida's DELTA Program
Since 2002, FCADV has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to develop and implement the Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) program. In 2003, FCADV organized a DELTA Oversight Committee composed of a diverse group of state-level professionals whose responsibilities include offering guidance and support to the State Coordinator and assisting with monitoring local projects. In 2006 the Oversight Committee expanded as its responsibilities evolved to include being responsible for creating a statewide prevention plan. The Committee is now referred to as DELTA State Steering Committee.

FCADV is committed to advancing the understanding and implementation of primary prevention principles at the local level. DELTA funds have allowed FCADV to provide numerous trainings and technical assistance visits for local DELTA programs in Florida.

FCADV continues to support local DELTA programs by providing program evaluation training and technical assistance. FCADV meets with local programs regularly to promote Getting to Outcomes, a planning framework, and empowerment evaluation. The state DELTA Coordinator also emphasizes primary prevention during trainings with non-DELTA and partner organizations.

In 2013, FCADV was awarded a new grant from the CDC called DELTA FOCUS (Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancements and Leadership Through Alliances, Focusing on Outcomes for Communities United with States). DELTA FOCUS is a five-year grant and Florida is one of 10 state domestic violence coalition grantees funded to engage in primary prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV).

Through DELTA FOCUS, FCADV supports IPV prevention at the state and local levels through strategies that address the structural determinants of health at the societal and community levels of the social-ecological model. In addition to addressing individual and relationship factors associated with IPV outcomes, FCADV supports work to change the environments and conditions in which people live, work and play.

 

State Future Directions
FCADV is committed to advancing primary prevention principles at the state level. The Coalition has been, and will continue to be, actively promoting primary prevention and plans by integrating prevention into upcoming events. FCADV and the State Steering Committee has created a state-level Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Plan that will guide its efforts in the coming years. An empowerment evaluator is working closely with the State Coordinator and the State Steering Committee to implement this plan. FCADV will continue to implement prevention principles, concepts, and practices within the Coalition and provide technical assistance to local projects and conduct training on primary prevention of intimate partner violence.

Local Projects
Project 1

CCR: Orange County Domestic Violence Task Force

Fiscal Agent: Harbor House

Priority Population: Underserved youth, communities of color

 

Project 2

CCR: Pasco County Domestic and Sexual Violence Task Force

Fiscal Agent: Sunrise of Pasco County, Inc.

Priority Population: Youth and the underserved

Purpose of the Program
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) domestic violence is a significant public health problem in the United States. Research indicates that Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) exists on a continuum from episodic violence-a single or occasional occurrence-to battering (Johnson, 1995). Battering is more frequent and intensive and involves one partner who develops and maintains control over the other. For additional information about the magnitude and consequences of IPV, see the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) IPV fact sheet.

All forms of IPV, from episodic violence to battering, are preventable. The key to prevention is focusing on first-time perpetration and first-time victimization. Knowledge about the factors that promote IPV is lacking. CDC is working to better understand the developmental pathways and social circumstances that lead to this type of violence. In addition, the agency is helping organizations evaluate the effectiveness of existing programs to reduce both victimization and perpetration.

The Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliances (DELTA) program seeks to reduce the incidence (i.e., number of new cases) of IPV in funded communities. The program addresses the entire continuum of IPV from episodic violence to battering through a variety of activities. 

For more information about Prevention or the DELTA Project contact Florida's DELTA Coordinator:

prevention@fcadv.org

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